Music Videos Getting More Expensive

5 comments

The WSJ reported that Warner and Universal are cutting video distribution partners to try to squeeze out a few more cents:

Vivendi SA's Universal Music Group pulled its music videos from Cablevision Systems Corp.'s Fuse network, and Warner Music Group Corp. told Yahoo Inc. to stop showing its music videos, in unrelated disputes over licensing fees and other issues, according to people familiar with both matters.
...
The disputes highlight the rising importance of music videos to record labels, which used to give music videos to outlets such as Viacom Inc.'s MTV practically free as a way to boost album sales. The labels now view the clips as valuable content that should generate revenue.

Having your commercials syndicated as content is about as good as you could ever wish to have it. To me this is an example of the record companies further pushing toward their own demise.

There still are many revenue opportunities based on adding more to music rather than trying to profit by cutting distribution and charging more for less. Beck wants to make albums more interactive. I also go to lots of concerts, and would love to pay extra for recordings of those concerts. But the labels are so focused on homogenisation and profit that they can't see how to extend out their offerings.

As time passes, and the number of potential aggregation outlets increases, aggregators are going to need to be able to add significant value to content or push serious distribution to be able to afford to access high quality content. For example, Viacom's MTV recently purchased Harmonix Music Systems for $175 million. Harmonix made the popular Guitar Hero and Karaoke Revolution games. Imagine going to MTV and playing whatever song you want.

Comments

Some People Don't get it

Quote:
Having your commercials syndicated as content is about as good as you could ever wish to have it. To me this is an example of the record companies further pushing toward their own demise.

Amen to that!

IMO it's not just the

IMO it's not just the RIAA/MPA/big labels, all media publishers need to embrace syndication. i agree it's a bit foolish what they're doing, but IMO they get villianized for doing what so many (most?) publishers are also doing: trying to profit by controlling distribution.

put another way, if the music labels are being short sighted (and i agree they are), then so is virtually every seller of encrypted software and DRM'd media.

Yes. Unfortunately for them,

Yes. Unfortunately for them, there's a new distribution medium, which gives artists the option to do their own. :)

agency in the new medium

agree with every word in this thread, no doubt.

If all authors, musicians, artists, and creators decided to cut out the (existing) institutional middlemen and sell directly, wouldn't there always be a market for agents to represent them and optimize the process?

So does anybody here have stories about taking rock bands (or anyone else) around the dinosaur labels, into direct sales?

circumventing record labels

Isn't that what Myspace is for?

If there is a market for agents, they'll be agencies who comb Myspace looking for the most influential profiles to push the new single/book/video on. Like the scandalous payola days of radio when DJ's were bribed to play new singles.

I'm presuming it's not happening on a large scale already, which could be naive.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.