Dotster Caught Cybersquatting

4 comments

In what appears to be a massive abuse of their power the registrar Dotster has apparently been registering misspellings and then trying to sell them for a premium.

Neiman Marcus and Bergdorf Goodman's complaint and exhibits, which total 155 pages, include excerpts from a conversation with Dotster employee Scott Fish, who allegedly asked for $1,000 for the name BergmanGoodman.com.

"It gets a good amount of traffic right now, and would be a great domain to brand," said a purported e-mail message from Fish to a prospective purchaser.

Looks like they have their hands in the cookie jar and were caught behaving badly trying to strong arm the site holders for a premium price.

However, I'm not sure how "Bergdorf Goodman" could claim cybersquatting for "BergmanGoodman.com" unless the little twerps at Dotster hadn't tried to sell them as alternate domains as Bergdorf and Bergman are NOT the same unless you're just stupid. It's somewhat of a bad example otherwise.

Makes GoDaddy look less evil about now, just don't spam on GoDaddy.
[you know who you are]

Comments

huh?

ummm.... huh? massive abuse of power?

How about NeimanGoodman and BergdorfMarcus?

Of course you need to be careful what yoy say in email, but if there is no "obvious" trademark infringement than somebody is enriching the lawyers with this kind of stuff. I can offer you IncredibleWilliam.com for $1000 no problem, at least until somebody makes a claim that it infringes on Incredibill.com. I would have done nothing wrong, sans intent.

And $1000 is not a premium price if it returns that in 12 months as a parked page. It's a bargain.

Stockholders should take note everytime a public company demonstrates its ignorance with steps like these. The Internet is so 90's and it's 2006 already.

Abuse

When you have access to unlimited domains and can just test them out to see what gets type-in traffic or not, something you and I can't for FREE, and those domains are specifically targetting misspellings of popular brand names, then it's abuse.

Normally this type of thing would be arbitrated by ICANN, and other registrars have also been implicated in such nonsense before, but apparently this case is so bad defendants banded together to sue.

However, this lawsuit covers claims of violations of both federal and state laws from trademark infringement and cybersquatting to deceptive acts and practices.

Should be amusing to see how it shakes out.

you can play too, incredibill.

Quote:
When you have access to unlimited domains and can just test them out to see what gets type-in traffic or not, something you and I can't for FREE, and those domains are specifically targetting misspellings of popular brand names, then it's abuse.

You, my friend, have access to domains limited only by the whois database of registered names and your own imagination. You've got 6 days to return the name without a charge. Alls you needs is toolz, and enough of a commitment to leave the funds working for you in the game.

Stockholders should take

Stockholders should take note everytime a pubic company demonstrates its ignorance with steps like these.

Duly noted.

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