Expandable Google Results Test

14 comments

Via SEW Google is testing an interface that allows you to expand individual results to provide more information about that listing.

Comments

Great. Now they're handing

Great. Now they're handing out more of the content they scraped off of my site so that the user has less of a reason to click through to the source.

Answer Engines...

Great. Now they're handing out more of the content they scraped off of my site so that the user has less of a reason to click through to the source.

I railed about this on the SEW Forums a couple years ago, and then wrote about it again last year (a year ago today, ironically) on the SEO/webdev newsletter I write.

The search engines will eventually become answer engines. They will get better at pulling information off a web site and giving it to the searcher immediately. That's what the recent Orion algorithm claims to do. It's why you can type "who discovered radium?" in the search box and get an answer:

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&safe=off&q=who+discovered+radium%3F+

It's also what the KnowItAll project at Univ. of Washington aims to do:

To address the problem of accumulating large collections of facts, we are developing KnowItAll --- a domain-independent system that extracts massive amounts of information from the Web in an autonomous, scalable manner.

http://www.cs.washington.edu/research/knowitall/

Lucky Me

That nonsense won't work on my site as all roads lead to Rome.

(translation: directory site with redirects, not all content in SE)

A new place for ad inventory?

Wouldn't it be swell if now not only needign two clicks to get to your site but when clicked the first time 'relevant' ads are served tailored to that site's vertical? So maybe when the click on the link to expand your site's info they show a few ads....of your competitors. Good if your rankings stink, bad if took you years and several thousand dollars to get there.

No Symbiosis - No Free Content

To address the problem of accumulating large collections of facts, we are developing KnowItAll --- a domain-independent system that extracts massive amounts of information from the Web in an autonomous, scalable manner.

The search engines will eventually become answer engines. They will get better at pulling information off a web site and giving it to the searcher immediately.

And when search engines stop making me money after I let them leech my content then they will go right into my robots.txt file.

When the symbiotic relationship content owners have with search engines cease - so will the source of the search engines free content.

information wants to be free

Information wants to be free. And everybody wants to monetize it. Poor, poor information.

Agreed, but..

And when search engines stop making me money after I let them leech my content then they will go right into my robots.txt file.

When the symbiotic relationship content owners have with search engines cease - so will the source of the search engines free content.

I feel the same way, but you're assuming:

1. They'll play along with your robots disallow, and
2. Yours is the only site where the information can be found.

I'd give #1 a "maybe", and #2 a "doubt it." The search engines will just get the same info. from the next site, and the user will get his answer all the same.

And John - LOL!

how does a search engine go

how does a search engine go about calculating an answer? for instance, if i type in "what is the capital of the united states?" how does an SE know that the answer is "washington dc"? probably because there are many pages from credible sites that have the words "capital, united, states, washington, dc" in very close proximity, if not outright printing the question and answer in logical/sequential format. is that really proprietary information that someone should be able to claim property rights over? isnt the SE making for a better user experience by allowing these answers to be easily disseminated and quickly consumed?

i dont think the SEs will deliver answers for any information that is not widely broadcasted, simply because i dont think they'll be able to. (or, perhaps more likely, they'll deliver the wrong answer). and if an SE is only disseminating information that is not really proprietary and is part of what we could call humanity's collective sphere of knowledge, then i personally say more power to them -- IMO that's the kind of thing that makes technology and innovation so great.

fair use

I don't think you gentlemen are taking into account the existing copyright laws. They allow fair use. Which is what the Google listings look like now (title, description and/or some text snippets).

Once the search engines start taking most of a web page (or a large part of it) and presenting it within their own framework and with advertising, it won't be fair use anymore. It will be stealing.

And the lawyers will make them stop. There might be a couple of dicey years while one or the other of them pushes the envelope too far before the class action suit slaps them down.

Nothing to worry about in the long run.

Fair Use

Quote:
I don't think you gentlemen are taking into account the existing copyright laws. They allow fair use. Which is what the Google listings look like now (title, description and/or some text snippets).

Once the search engines start taking most of a web page (or a large part of it) and presenting it within their own framework and with advertising, it won't be fair use anymore. It will be stealing.

Fair Use has nothing to do with the length or amount of copyrighted material used. There is nothing in the law that states a certain amount is too much.

One of the major sticking points with fair use is damage to the commercial value of the work. If someone searches for who discovered radium and a snippet from my page was pulled, thus the user did not need to go to my site directly to find the answer, you are in essence hurting the value of my copyrighted material.

Since Fair Use is determined on an individual basis and really has no exact laws, this would need to be brought to court first. In my opinion, it is a violation of copyright. When you provide the user with the exact fact or data they searched for from a page without sending them to that page, you have crossed the line.

Ronsard: Cache

Ronsard: Cache

more screenshots here

more screenshots here

also notice
- search this site
- inside this site (links to other pages on that site)
- related (links to related sites)

I think those added features

I think those added features are important because they allow Google to leverage the value offered by many vertical search systems without having to invest the resources necessary to build and brand a million different verticals.

I dunno whether that's good

I dunno whether that's good or bad!

So is it gonna expand and display just the first paragraph of a page? Or a relevant paragraph relating to the query? Both have consequences whichever way you look at it :¬s

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.