Confirmed: Google Buys Writely

11 comments

It's been rumored around the web, and now it's confirmed: Google has acquired Upstartle, the makers of Writely.

Concerned about Google having even more information on you? Writely says no fear:

Our #1 priority is to maintain (and improve) the reliability, privacy and security of the Writely service for our current users.

True to Google spirit, Writely is in beta.

Comments

Wow...that is a strike to MS

Wow...that is a strike to MS Office. Doesn't MSN want to put office so you can edit docs online?

So, is NumSum next or what?

So, is NumSum next or what? Their blog has been quiet for a while.

Heh...Funny. Although I definitely don't see it as a strike to MS Office. Not even a competitor. It might be useful in lesser developed countries where people aren't already hooked on MS Office, though.

Just like the strike to all anaylitics companies?

Wasn't the purchase of Urchin a strike to other analytics companies? Google is still clueless when it comes to implementing these things properly to the masses. It's a cute purchase that we will never see fully used.

Yeah I am yawning. I am an

Yeah I am yawning. I am an Open Office user.

Btw you're right grnidone,

Btw you're right grnidone, Google and MS have a shared interest in internet-delivered applications.

In both cases it reduces versioning problems, provides timely updates across the whole user-base, reduces piracy problems, introduces licensing price ladders / upgrade paths (pay-as-you-go) and add on services on demand, and so on.

Plus, it's about the most closed type of closed-source application you can get - if the customer can't even get to the application s/he is using there's very little chance of reverse engineering.

I would only suppose that Google wants to replace our hard drive(s) as well, ie. to store all our precious pr0.. eh, documents. I'm pretty sure MS don't feel a need to do that.

just a little patience

i didnt even know about numsum although that seems to fit the puzzle quite nicely.

IMHO the stage is being prepared now. i think om malik's chart summarizes things nicely.

when the $100 laptop with a linux or google OS comes out, with firefox installed as the default browser, and when there's a writely link from your gmail and from your blogger blog and your gdrive and from your personalized google account, the masses will enlist.

why didnt msft acquire writely, and why are they moving so slowly in terms of getting office online?

Kid there are alternatives

Kid there are alternatives out there still if they want to buy them. That being said MS just seems to slow with internet stuff. I don't know why, they have some brilliant people there.

writeley

I tested writely before and still have an account there. If I was in school or was using it for home stuff I could see it being cool. For a business it puts too much faith in other companies for my liking. I don't let people who I outsource writing to use GMail to send documents back and forth, so I can't see using writely for anything of any importance.

it's a BUSINESS 1.0 thing

With MS, there are two things that make them more measured in introducing new product.

First, they value QA testing. This is driven by the second thing, which is the support requirement for each new product.

On the other hand, Google throws it out there and hopes it sticks. Support? What's that?

ps. Canned email does not count as support.

First, they [MS] value QA

First, they [MS] value QA testing. This is driven by the second thing, which is the support requirement for each new product. On the other hand, Google throws it out there and hopes it sticks. Support? What's that?

Up to a point.

It's just as true that MS spends 6 years developing an elephant of system that does not work (therefore NEEDS support), while G makes small, lite, simple things that work.

Of course there are limitations in the uses of G's stuff; and few of their products are directly comparable. But MS haven't genuinely innovated in years. G does in its sleep.

And when G buy other innovators, their work sees the light of day. While MS usually buy to kill the (potential) competition.

And when G buy other

And when G buy other innovators, their work sees the light of day. While MS usually buy to kill the (potential) competition.

I tend to disagree that there's a difference here. Both things are simply what companies do, including those two. Also, lousy products are found in both camps - that's what happens in R&D, sometimes you hit and sometimes you miss.

Microsoft have a larger range of products and they are good at integrating purchased solutions into existing products, so their purchases see the light as well. Examle from two days ago

Market share is a commodity to some extent. It can be bought, and that's what larger firms usually do. In quite a few cases it's cheaper to buy the competition than it is to beat them.

Google sofar haven't really bought competitors to existing Google products. Why? Because their portfolio is too damn small. Their only income-generating product of importance is adwords/adsense and which competitor should they buy here - Overture? Even if they could, would that have a significant effect on their market share or revenues? One that justifies the costs? Personally I don't think so, at least not at this moment.

So, you can't automatically assume that lack of history equals lack of intent.

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