Death of Affiliate Marketing?

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Source Title:
Motley Fool
Story Text:

Rick Munarriz over at the Motley Fool poses the question in the title of this post today. He mentions the low buyout price of Doubleclick and the dropping of the Fastclick share price as pointers to answer the question.

After all, if websites everywhere are taking to contextual ad blocks, doesn't logic suggest that graphic banner ads and affiliate marketing are being pushed off the page?

I don't know if he knows that Google are now doing graphic banner ads?

While most dot-com marketers have made the transition to paid search -- even the most eclectic of searches on Google may result in an eBay sponsored link -- Amazon is different. It is deeply integrated into way too many sites, and if webmasters see that it is more cost-effective to strip out Amazon ads in favor of paid-search ad blocks, the leading online retailer is going to suffer in the process.

It is an interesting article but am not sure about some of the points he make at all.

Comments

 

"Why would any webmaster feature a single graphic ad when that same space could be replaced by as many as five targeted text ads from Google?"

"Longtime Fool contributor Rick Munarriz believes that contextual paid search is far more effective than banner and rich media ads"

Why is it that so many people equate Affiliate Marketing to BANNER ADS?
Well, it must be that 90% of affiliates publish banner farms while the other 10% make all the money.

m2c

 

there will always be sites where something like an Amazon ad is way more appropriate than AdSense. Consumers know that sites get paid for the Amazon ads but it's perceived (IMO and in my markets) as more of a service offered for which the site gets a commission than as an attempt to make extra cash from your customers.

Some might take a hefty hit but I don't see affiliations in general dying any time soon, business partnerships make the world go 'round.

I have just seen

The most incredible streaming video banners that are simply amazing. A banner that loads, say 30kb, and puts 3 movie title's trailers a click away and also can attract attention with arrows or other graphics that leave the actual boundaries of the banner is definitely going to bring some flare back to banner marketing. Oh, and I didn't mean the videos load in a new page, they don't, they materialize right there, are fully scaleable (to full screen practically) and the compression is so incredible they don't skip in streaming video on standard broadband. Fun stuff, impressive demonstration I was lucky to see.

 

I dont do much in the lines of affiliate stuff, but from my experience pages that look like unbiased information or testimonials convert far better than those which look like ads.

 

After all, if websites everywhere are taking to contextual ad blocks, doesn't logic suggest that graphic banner ads and affiliate marketing are being pushed off the page?

Munarriz misses one important point: Good affiliate marketers were there first, not with links in contextual ad blocks, but with links woven throughout contextual affiliate pages.

And that leads directly to MrMackin's off-the-cuff -- but probably not too far off -- guestimate of "90% of affiliates publish banner farms while the other 10% make all the money."

Huh? What?

That was one of the most confused (or confusing?) articles I've read in the past year. Should have been broken into at least two articles: "Graphic Ad Banners Losing Their Appeal? (Again!)" ... and "Mega Affiliate Marketers About to Take a Hit?". Not that either of those articles would be of much interest either, but at least they'd make sense.

I'm pretty sure it's still a basic tenet of journalism that the body of the article is supposed to follow the general gist of the headline. ;-) If it did, we'd have to start with getting the headline right, e.g., something like: "Affiliate marketers riding high, despite recent predictions of doom..." Hehe.

Making Money

Well Doubleclick and Fastclick may be loseing value/money, but every affiliate program I am into makes money, is expanding and the bottom line just keeps growing month after month.

Maybe it is just poor management or other market factors that are causing these guys to lose value. Or maybe Rick Munarriz just needed somthing to write about.

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