Shoemoney in the New York Times

16 comments

Fellow TW editor Shoemoney gets a mention and a link drop in The New York Times - The Lazy Top 10 Anything

The burgeoning online-marketing blog ShoeMoney predicts that in 2007, Microsoft will acquire Yahoo, and offers 10 reasons. Most of them have to do with Microsoft being far behind Google and other competitors in areas including search technology, online video and social networking. ShoeMoney’s proprietor, Jeremy Schoemaker, believes Yahoo would give Microsoft a leg up (shoemoney.com).

Way to go Jeremy!

Comments

Guardian does have a link

Quote:
Shoe Money has an interesting post about how his server got hacked via an old file in an unused subdirectory.

the digg effect

Both the post featured in the NYT and the one on the Guardian's blog were heavily dugg over the last fortnight.

http://www.digg.com/tech_news/How_Hackers_Are_Using_Google_To_Pwn_Your_Site
http://digg.com/tech_news/10_Reasons_Why_Microsoft_Will_Acquire_Yahoo_In_2007

Clearly what tech news gets covered by mainstream journalists is heavily influenced by the likes of Digg.

Gee Dad, I wish I was

Gee Dad, I wish I was shoemoney.

Sigh

Making money for 2 years on ring tones qualifies him now as a corporate finance guru to be quoted in the NYT?

Guess i'd better rush out and buy Yahoo shares right away. How many do you own Shoemoney?

What kind of traffic did

What kind of traffic did that link from nytimes.com send over?

Congrats!

WTG Shoe, just keep rolling in the cash.

the shoemoney

Quote:
Gee Dad, I wish I was shoemoney.

LOL

Seriously though, Shoemoney has done a great job at building his online persona/profile among non-professionals over the last few years. I think Aaron's the only one who's surpassed him in that regard. Many of the other SEO/M personalities have faded from (online) prominence for whatever reason (I'm sure not everyone necessarily wants the spotlight).

Keep it up shoe!

What kind of traffic did

What kind of traffic did that link from nytimes.com send over?

Not much from the link maybe 800 uniqes total so far. Traffic to shoemoney.com though from direct typins was up 25% so I think more people came from the print news paper.

Clearly what tech news gets covered by mainstream journalists is heavily influenced by the likes of Digg.

Totally if there is anything digg traffic is good for its alerting reporters (if that is your goal.. seems to get me in trouble usually)

Shoemoney has done a great job at building his online persona/profile among non-professionals over the last few years.

Thanks for the kind words. I am just another guy trying to make a living not working for the man. Everyday that I can do that I am thankful. Most of the credit for the shoemoney "persona" goes to daveN and a few other good friends in the industry who made a lot of connections for me early on.

"Thanks for the kind words.

"Thanks for the kind words. I am just another guy trying to make a living not working for the man"

Right, I saw the price of the elite retreat. Heh, you cads. Milking the online persona for all you can get for telling people how to get backlinks and do ppc.The info is out there anyway but it seems some people need to pay 5k for confirmation :) Good on ya, if you can get away with it, why not :)

The info is out there anyway

The info is out there anyway but it seems some people need to pay 5k for confirmation

I think the greatest value delivered was not the "information" but how the information applied specifically to their sites and businesses. We had a session where we went one on one with each person and answered their questions and gave them specific actionable advice.

@MaxD

Milking the online persona for all you can get for telling people how to get backlinks and do ppc.

I don't think they're milking at all.

There's something to be said about the value of rapid hands-on training as you get access to a lot of expertise and ideas quickly that would otherwise take a long learning curve to gain, if ever.

Some people can learn on their own, like I pick up a book on a new programming language or a new Windows API and just use it. Others struggle, get frustrated, and take a college class, online class, or pay big bucks for hands-on training.

It's all good, rake in the dough boys :)

I'm with Aaron and Bill on

I'm with Aaron and Bill on this one. It's hardly milking it. Just having a few additional sets of intelligent eyes take a pass on what you're doing usually pays off in spades. In fact, I'm probably going to fly in some of the fellow Threadwatchers to my offices to do a review of everything we've got going on. It'll cost me a lot more than $5GR to do that, but if just one of them points out something I overlooked, it could earn back 100x that cost.

a sign of inexperience

When I see someone say "it' all out there, all you need to do is read it" I take that as a sign of inexperience. The most revealing experience for me comes from speaking with some of those "home grown" seo newbies. They know it all, and can't prioritize any of it. They worry about things that are high profile but practically meaningless, and that stymies their progress.

Over and over I hear "but I didn't want to do that, because I didn't want to get hit with the XXX penalty" or the classic "My SEO is perfect. I'm just not getting enough traffic". Most of them have bought Aaron's book for some reason or another.

Look at the "free iPod with registration" gimmick. Another way to get someone (attendee) to spend someone else's money (their employer). Nobody tracks a freebie that comes with a registration, but many people have budgets to spend on training. Help them to spend it on your event with a $250 gimmie. In their minds, if it sucks at least they got a free iPod. If you don't think people think like that, you probably don't belong in marketing.

Sounds like Elite Retreat was also a way to separate people who don't have approval authority to hire consultants from their travel/training budgets. Doesn't matter if they had a mental block about hiring consultants, an actual corporate approval process to hurdle, or simply an analysis paralysis about trusting one of them. Whatever, they got consulting, right? And they paid consulting rates for it. The program creators found a way to sell consulting to that market. Not a bad move, especially if you couldn't otherwise overcome some of those consultant credibility hurdles (I'm not saying.... I'm just saying...)

Whopper Net is like that IMHO, too. As are the big casinos. How many times have you heard about packaging?

I am more of a question and

I am more of a question and answer sort of guy at an hourly rate for consulting. I do the same for lawyers when they try and sell me "the package" I know the shaft is coming :) Like I say, good luck to you but at $300 an hour I could get almost 20 hours of personalised ( one on one, not with 35 other people) consulting time for the same amount of money. If you look at it that way it is a bit steep to me.

He must have some killer

He must have some killer URLs... good on him. Like his office design too. Nice wood choice sir!

Oh, and nice check!

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